‘Biggest Loser’ winner talks controversy, feels ‘proud’ of ‘healthy weight loss’

When Rachel Frederickson won “The Biggest Loser” after dropping almost 60 percent of her body weight, it sparked a backlash on social media from viewers who were concerned about her extreme transformation. Three weeks later, Frederickson wants to set the record straight — she’s healthy, and she’s proud what she accomplished.

“You know, I did work so hard for the finale and finding myself again,” she explained to TODAY’s Savannah Guthrie. “I felt amazing on the stage. I felt like I shined in my dress. Then I got off the stage, and Twitter was all abuzz.”

Frederickson, who started the competition weighing in at 260 pounds and ended it at just 105, was shocked by the reaction.

“I was (surprised), because I felt proud of everything I’d accomplished,” she said. “My journey was my own, and I loved it; I lived it. So, I felt really proud of what I did.”

Although Fredrickson recently admitted that she might have been “a little too enthusiastic” in preparing for the finale, she now wants “Biggest Loser” fans to know that she didn’t do anything unhealthy to get where she is.

“It was absolutely healthy weight loss,” she assured. “I dieted and exercised and did it healthy the whole way. I appreciate all the concern, and I can see where it comes from. There is the ‘movie magic’ — it’s over (the course of) seven months; it’s almost a year of my life losing the weight. I was very unhealthy at 260 pounds and now, post finale, I’m the healthiest, most alive I’ve ever felt.”

Frederickson said she’s in “maintenance mode” now, “which is just as hard as hard as losing the weight.” And despite her successful weight loss, she still worries about slipping into old habits.

“Of course, that thought always comes up, but I think what I’ve learned is that I have an inner strength,” she said. “I have a voice and I can trust myself. (Before) I didn’t trust myself. I was critical, and I judged myself.”

But she’s over than now.

“That’s why I love Love Your Selfie week,” she added. “It’s just this self-image that you’re with you the rest of your life, so you better accept you and love yourself. If everyone can have that gift, then that’s amazing. That’s what I’ve gotten from ‘The Biggest Loser.'”

 

source: Today Style
Advertisements

Jessica Leonard, 7 year old girl weighed 400lbs

Jessica Leonard, 5 year old girl weighed 230lbs (140Kg).   According to an article in Woman’s Day magazine by Graeme Culliford V (reposted on Bodybuilding forums) Jessica’s weight problem had become life-threatening, made her unable to walk, and caused severe respiratory and circulatory issues.

In October of 2005, a stranger had called Children’s Services to report their concern for Jessica’s well-being, prompting a 19 month stay at a specialized obesity clinic in Virgina, where the eight year old successfully got her weight back down to 110 lbs. Diet and exercise are credited as being the method of weight loss, although she has undergone other surgeries to correct other related issues such as excess skin and bowed legs.

source: cheezburger

By the time Jessica was 7 years old, she weighed in at 400lbs.  Since that time, Jessica has apparently received medical attention with a focus on increasing energy expenditure, a strict diet, and prescription of some undisclosed medication. Miraculously, as the next video shows she has lost a tremendous amount of weight.

Full story:    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cNATWsVVwgo

A Low Carb Diet Superior for Overweight Children Once Again

Source: Diet Doctor

Happy children in brightly coloured t-shirts , umping.

Do you want to lose weight? Study after study shows that if you do, you should avoid sugar and starch. This is also true for children and youth. A new study showed that children (on average 13 years old) lost more weight on a strict low carbohydrate diet, despite eating until satisfied!

Children who instead received low fat and low calorie dietary advice had more difficulty losing weight, despite going hungry. Nor did their health markers improve in comparison.

At least two studies have previously demonstrated better weight for overweight children and youth who were given advice on a strict low carbohydrate diet [1 2]. And altogether there are now at least 18 studies of highest standard (RCT) clearly demonstrating a better weight on a low carbohydrate diet compared to “eat less and run more”. The latter advice has to my knowledge never won in any comparative study. Nor has anybody been able to show me such a study.

This means 18-0 in favor of a low carbohydrate diet.

A low carbohydrate diet is dieting for smart people who enjoy life (and who exercise for the purpose of being fit and feeling well). Eating pasta daily, counting calories and having to exercise like an elite athlete to get slim is a good option for masochists.